Monday, January 10, 2011

Impressions of Water


I’ve been contemplating gaining more motivation to drink more water. Here is a little of the information that is now compelling me to hydrate!


I’ve learned that I need far more water than the suggested 8 glasses a day. The average adult losses about 2 ½ to 3 liters of fluid a day through sweating, breathing, bathroom use, moving, even sleeping, and the body becomes dehydrated if it isn’t replaced.

I’ve even wondered if you don’t get enough water, do you hang on to fat or worse, get fatter? Some scientists believe that even mild dehydration slow metabolism be as much as 3 percent. Besides, I believe that in general, we are so poorly attuned to our bodies’ thirst signals that we often interpret them as hunger pangs. Of course, that leads to more eating. Finally, I’ve learned that if we don’t get enough water, our bodies actually retain water, feeling bloated and uncomfortable.

The most important information motivating me to drink up is that our bodies use water to neutralize acids, to dilute excess acid, and to literally wash them and all other toxins away through bathroom use and sweat. Without enough water the body becomes too acidic and goes into preservation mode – fat storing mode! A drop of just 2 percent in body water content is enough to make this happen. Just think, it’s not unusual to lose 2 percent of your body water during an average hour of exercise.

A lack of water can lead to daytime fatigue. Without enough water you don’t have enough energy. That 2 percent drop can result in a measurable decrease in physical performance. The acid that builds up in your tissues when you don’t get enough water acts like a meat tenderizer. Could that be what is making me even more flabby? And weak? Then, I found that some studies show that a 3 percent drop in water causes a 10 percent drop in muscle strength and an 8 percent drop in speed, as well as lower muscle endurance. More amazing was the study suggestion that further lose of water resulted with symptoms of dizzieness, concentration, drowsiness, ompatience, and headaches. Dehyration can also cause muddles thinking, short-term memory problems, trouble with basic math or expressing yourself verbally, and difficulty focusing. I’ve even experience cold hands, anxiety, irritability, depression, sugar cravings, and cramps. Most of my symptoms decreased as I experimented with drinking more good water.

Water seems pretty important when you think about these facts: you can go 30 about 30 days without eating but you can’t live 72 hours without water.

Fortunately, drinking more water is a relatively easy problem to solve. Drink it!

Water helps process just about every biological, mechanical, and chemical action that takes place in the body. After all, water cushions and protects vital organs, transport nutrients to cells, and dispels wastes. Lungs need water to humidify air. The digestive system uses several gallons of water daily to process food. The brain needs water to perform chemical reactions. Water keeps the skin soft and supple, increases oxygen in the blood, and maintains normal electrical properties of the cells.

These all seem to me to be the perfect reason to drink water – and tons of it! It is my goal to consumer ½ of my body weight in ounces of water a day. That comes to nearly 25 cups of water a day. I’ve been practicing this hydrating habit since the middle of September and have proven to my self that water is the drink of choice.

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for the reminder. Put in that context, maybe it will stick with m e better. Sometimes I just don't remember to drink! Cheers!

    ReplyDelete